News
July 18 2016

Emergency Medicine holds Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS) Workshop

By: Dianne Marie M. De Jesus, MD, and Mark Paul S. Castillo, MD, Emergency Medicine Residents

The Department of Emergency Medicine of Makati Medical Center, in cooperation with the West Virginia State University Department of Emergency Medicine and Philippine College of Emergency Medicine, held an introductory course for the use of point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) on May 20.

POCUS 2016

Kristine Robinson, MD, Emergency Ultrasound Fellow of the West Virginia University Department of Emergency Medicine, together with Romulo Babasa III, MD and his team – Drs. Richard Vincent Dimagiba, Cherielynn Dianne Go, and Ma. Karla Aurora Cruz – shared their in-depth knowledge and practical expertise on POCUS.  

POCUS is the use of portable ultrasonography at a patient’s bedside for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

The topics discussed included the basic skills and fundamental knobology or functionality of controls of emergency ultrasound, FAST (focused assessment sonography for trauma), abdominal aorta, FoCUS (focused cardiac ultrasound), deep vein thrombosis (DVT), lung ultrasound and FEEL (Focused Echocardiography in Emergency Life Support). 

To complement the plenary lectures, a hands-on training on eFAST (extended FAST), aorta and lung ultrasound, FoCUS, DVT, and ocular ultrasound capped the entire course.

Gabriel G. Gabriel, MD, Chairman of the Department of Emergency Medicine, spearheaded the organizing committee to make this event possible and successful. The Emergency Medicine consultants and residents were joined by the cardiology fellows and surgical residents. The workshop had 6 working stations with different ultrasound equipment, ranging from the full-scale ultrasound model to the hand-held portable machines. When asked about his feedback on the activity, Dr. Gabriel expressed his utmost satisfaction because the objectives of the activity were met.  He hopes that programs like this can be harnessed not only for the continuing medical education of our physicians but ultimately, to upgrade the level of care in the Emergency Department.

A physician’s pursuit of knowledge is unceasing, especially in this era of ever-escalating medical technology. The ultrasound has been described as an extension of the emergency physician’s senses, a “visual stethoscope”, so to speak. These tools complement one’s skills and experience to help us become better healers and masters of our craft – to save lives. Indeed, the point-of-care ultrasound has proven to be invaluable in the emergency setting, in spelling the difference between life and death. 

Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is the use of portable ultrasonography at a patient’s bedside. In this photo, a volunteer is being examined during the workshop.

The Department of Emergency Medicine, in cooperation with the West Virginia State University Department of Emergency Medicine and Philippine College of Emergency Medicine, held an introductory course for the use of point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) on May 20.